Appendix


18 Carat gold

Carat (or sometimes spelt Karat) is a unit of purity for gold alloys which is measured as 24 times the pure mass divided by the total mass. All Emily Becher Jewellery items are stamped with a purity fineness mark which confirms the precious metal content, expressed in parts per thousand with the border denoting principle elemental metal in accordance with Australian Standard AS-2140-2008. In the case of 18 carat gold the stamp has the numbers 750 in a double circle border as shown in The Gold & Silversmiths Guild of Australia Metal Standards document. 18 Carat gold can be created in White, Yellow and Rose colour for which the amount of pure gold remains at 750 parts of 1000 (75%) however the other metals making up the remaining 25% of the alloy are different which allows for the difference in colour. All of the precious metal used in Emily Becher Jewellery Creations is Nickel free to avoid allergic reactions.

9 Carat Gold

Carat (or sometimes spelt Karat) is a unit of purity for gold alloys which is measured as 24 times the pure mass divided by the total mass. All Emily Becher Jewellery items are marked with a purity fineness mark which confirms the precious metal content, expressed in parts per thousand with the border denoting principle elemental metal in accordance with Australian Standard AS-2140-2008. In the case of 9 carat gold the stamp has the numbers 375 in a double circle border as shown in The Gold & Silversmiths Guild of Australia Metal Standards document. 9 Carat gold can be created in White, Yellow and Rose colour, the amount of pure gold remains at 375 parts of 1000 (37.5%) however the other metals making up the remaining 62.5% of the alloy are different which allows for the difference in colour. All of the precious metal used in Emily Becher Jewellery Creations is Nickel free to avoid allergic reactions.

Alloy

A precious metal Alloy is a metal composed of two or more metals. The combination of metals used can be quite varied depending on the desired result. Some alloys are specially formulated to produce a particular colour, for example; White gold or rose gold. Whilst the alloy Sterling Silver is created by combining copper with pure silver to create a stronger metal whilst still retaining the silver colour. Emily Becher Jewellery creations are all made with nickel free alloys to avoid allergic reactions.

Black Ruthenium Plated

This is a surface treatment in which a thin micron layer of jet black coloured Ruthenium is deposited across the surface of gold metal using the electroplating method. Emily Becher Jewellery uses this technique on selected gold items in order to accentuate textured detail. Because this surface treatment is highly subject to abrasion, Emily polishes or brushes back the highest surface layers of the plating when finishing the jewellery so that customers are not mislead in believing that their jewellery will maintain a perfect black layer of plating forever. The plating that is deposited in the recessed areas of a design will remain there for many years as these areas will not come into contact with objects that would otherwise scratch away the surface treatment.

Bright Silver

This is a term used throughout the Emily Becher Jewellery website to describe sterling silver in its natural state without the use of surface patinas to change its colour.

Brushed Satin

This is a term used throughout the Emily Becher Jewellery website to describe a surface finishing texture that has minuscule scratches on the surface of the metal causing it to appear matte. Whilst this finish does not add a surface patina to the metal, the soft scratches on the surface of the metal change the way that light refracts from its surface, which to the human eye makes the metal appear a slightly duller colour than the polished version.

Burnished

A burnished surface is one that has undergone a treatment in which hard but smooth surfaced metal has been pushed across the surface of the jewellery causing it to appear shiny. This process is used on bright silver items as well as oxidised silver items. In the case of burnished oxidised items, the burnishing process changes the dusty dark grey colour of oxidised silver to a shiny black colour.

Comfort fit

Comfort fit refers to the inner profile or shape of a ring band. The comfort fit is aptly named as it is the most comfortable style in which the inside of the band is slightly domed, leaving more room at each side of the width of the ring for the skin of your finger to move around as you clench and unclench your hand during normal everyday tasks.

Diamond carat

The carat measurement of diamonds and gemstones is different to that of precious metal. The carat measurement for gemstones is a measurement of mass equal to 0.2grams but will always be referred to as a carat or point weight. To explain how this all works and the terminology surrounding it; 1 carat is equal to 100 points. So a half carat diamond might be referred to as 0.5 carat or it might be referred to as a 50 point diamond. Similarly a quarter of a carat diamond can be referred to as a 0.25 carat or as a 25 point diamond.

Often people get caught up in size alone when choosing their diamond, however at Emily Becher Jewellery we encourage you to consider the other important aspects of clarity, colour and cut which all affect how your chosen diamond is valued financially, but more importantly, valued by your loved one.

Diamond clarity

The formation of diamonds happens in the earth, over millions of years and under extreme heat and pressure. Because of such conditions, each diamond comes with natural marks or imperfections within it, and these marks are better known as inclusions. This natural process ensures that no two diamonds have the same inclusions, so the clarity of a diamond is what makes each one truly unique. The general rule of thumb is that the fewer inclusions a diamond has, the rarer and more highly-valued it is.

Diamond colour

Colourless diamonds in the D, E and F range of the Diamond colour scale are more highly valued than those with visible colour. However, near colourless diamonds in the G-J range are more commonly used because of their great value. When it comes to Fancy Coloured Diamonds the colour grading is focused on deep even colours as the most valued, and brown diamonds range from ‘Champagne’ to ‘Cognac’ (C1 to C7) which can be quite stunning and vary again in value from white diamonds. For many people, learning about diamond colours can be overwhelming, but you can relax and know that the relevant colour variations will all be explained and shown to you when you consult with Emily for your diamond jewellery.

Diamond cut

The cut of a diamond is an extremely important factor when it comes to choosing the right diamond. Some stones are cut too shallow so that their circumference is larger and the stone appears bigger, but when the stone is cut in this way the light escapes through the pavilion before it can be reflected and results in a dull looking stone. Similarly deep cut diamonds allow light to escape through the opposite side of the pavilion resulting again in a dull diamond. Based on scientific formulas, a well-cut diamond will internally reflect light from one mirror-like facet to another and disperse and reflect it through the top of the stone. This results in a display of brilliance and fire and makes the diamond more valuable.

Gold Plated

This is a surface treatment in which a thin micron layer of gold is deposited across the surface of another metal using the electroplating method. Emily Becher Jewellery uses this technique with yellow and rose gold plating solutions on selected items in order to accentuate textured detail. Because this surface treatment is highly subject to abrasion, Emily polishes or brushes back the highest surface layers of the plating when finishing the jewellery so that customers are not mislead in believing that their jewellery will maintain a solid gold layer of plating forever. The plating that is deposited in the recessed areas of a design will remain there for many years as these areas will not come into contact with objects that would otherwise scratch away the surface treatment.

Lost Wax Casting Method

This method of creating jewellery objects begins with a wax model that has been custom hand carved or a wax model that has been obtained by injecting wax into a rubber mould of a previously carved and moulded jewellery object. These waxes are then sprued or joined, along with other waxes, to create a wax tree that is then placed into a flask and the empty space surrounding the wax is filled with refractory plaster. Once this hardens around the wax tree, the wax is then all burnt out and molten metal is cast in its place by centrifugal or vacuum casting methods. The term “lost wax” refers to this end process where the wax disappears and is replaced by solid metal.

Oxidised Silver

Oxidised silver is the term used to describe blackened sterling silver. Sterling silver naturally oxidises over time from exposure to oxygen which builds up a coating of oxide discolouring the metal, often referred to as ‘tarnishing’. By oxidising the metal, Emily is speeding up this process in order to create an even black surface patina across the metals surface. However because this is just a surface treatment and highly subject to abrasion, Emily polishes or brushes back the highest surface layers of the oxidisation when finishing the jewellery so that customers are not mislead in believing that their jewellery will maintain a perfectly even black layer forever. The plating that is deposited in the recessed areas of a design will remain there for many years as these areas will not come into contact with objects that would otherwise scratch away the surface treatment.

Patina

A patina is a thin layer that forms on the surface of metal through oxidisation or other chemical processes.

Platinum

Platinum is one of the rarer metals and as such generally maintains a higher value per gram than gold. Because this metal is denser than other precious metals, Platinum jewellery will always be more expensive due to the fact that it will weigh more in grams than that of an identical sized object in gold. However, the benefits of purchasing platinum jewellery are that it is one of the strongest metals and wears incredibly well over a long period of time in comparison to gold alloys. It also has a beautiful bright white colour that does not require rhodium plating. So it is the ideal metal to use in the creation of engagement and wedding rings as these are items that will be worn every day and endure the impact of our daily lives. Having your rings made in Platinum ensures that the surface will gain fewer dings and scratches and there will be no need for constant re-plating which can save you money in the long run.

All Emily Becher Jewellery items are stamped with a purity fineness mark which confirms the precious metal content, expressed in parts per thousand with the border denoting principle elemental metal in accordance with Australian Standard AS-2140-2008. In the case of Platinum the stamp has the numbers 950 in a kite shaped border as shown in The Gold & Silversmiths Guild of Australia Metal Standards document. Other Platinum alloys (ie. 900 or 90% Platinum) are available upon request. All of the precious metal used in Emily Becher Jewellery Creations is Nickel free to avoid allergic reactions.

Polished

Polished refers to the glossy smooth reflective finish that is achieved on the surface of the metal.

Rhodium Plated

This is a surface treatment in which a thin micron layer of Rhodium is deposited across the surface of another metal using the electroplating method. This is generally used on 9 and 18 carat white gold to make it appear more like Platinum in colour. Emily Becher Jewellery does offer Rhodium plating for her white gold jewellery upon request, ensuring that customers understand that it is only a surface treatment and is highly subject to abrasion.

Sterling Silver

All Emily Becher Jewellery items are stamped with a purity fineness mark which confirms the precious metal content, expressed in parts per thousand with the border denoting principle elemental metal in accordance with Australian Standard AS-2140-2008. In the case of Sterling Silver the stamp has the numbers 925 in an oval shaped border as shown in The Gold & Silversmiths Guild of Australia Metal Standards document. Sterling silver is an alloy composed of 92.5% fine silver mixed with 7.5% copper or other metals. All of the precious metal used in Emily Becher Jewellery Creations is Nickel free to avoid allergic reactions.

Titanium

Titanium is a reactive metal that Emily sometimes uses in her work. It is incredibly strong, often used in aerodynamic construction due to its strength and lightweight characteristics. This metal is difficult to use in jewellery as it cannot be soldered and can only be welded or riveted together. However, its main appeal is that it can be anodised or thermally coloured which changes the way the light refracts from its surface and to the human eye the metal can appear blue, green, purple, pink etc depending on the amount of voltage or heat used in the process.